The Secret Genius of Charles III

by de Vere Edwards          (Sunday 22 March 2263)

The public face

On the three hundredth anniversary of the release of the first album traditionally credited to the Beatles, Please Please Me, it is a good moment to revisit the controversy surrounding the true authorship of their “self-written” music.

 

Most critics are now agreed that four ordinary boys growing up with only a rudimentary education could not possibly have produced music of such complexity and beauty.  Little is known about the early lives of John, Paul, George and Ringo, and although literacy was widespread in the mid 20th century, it is quite possible that they could not read or write.

They are known, however, to have been raised in Liverpool, a poor city in the north of England.  In the 1950s when they were growing up, Liverpool would have been mostly rubble from the Middle War which ended in 1945: and although some people in England enjoyed the benefits of running water and electricity by now, it is very unlikely that these services would have been available in Liverpool at the time.

So we can safely dismiss the idea that four poorly educated people brought up in such poverty and squalor – effectively urban peasants – could have created such joyful, uplifting and often sophisticated music.  Of course, this raises the question: who did write and record it?  Obviously only someone with a complete and presumably expensive education.  And of course, someone young enough to be enthusiastic about youth music, which did not become popular in Britain until about 1955.

When you look at the context, an answer springs out straight away.  The man usually named as their “producer” is George Martin, who is known to have made recordings with The Goons, a popular comedy act of the time.  And the Goons had a notable fan: Prince Charles – at the time heir to the British throne, later briefly Charles III.

George Martin – the fixer
The British monarchy was extremely conservative at this time, and Queen Elizabeth’s son could not be seen to be involved in anything so vulgar or scandalous as popular music.  So he would have been faced with a dilemma: how could he get his songs recorded and released?  Charles is known to have been an associate of Spike Milligan – the writer of The Goon Show – who once wittily called Charles a “grovelling bastard”. Spike would have known George Martin well, and most likely set up a meeting between the two.
Prince Charles (right) with Spike Milligan – the link

After that it would have been a simple step to get his songs recorded. Martin, as a senior producer at EMI records, would have had access to capable musicians and good recording studios: he would also have had the contacts to recruit likeable working class actors to provide the public face of the band, while making sure they were kept well away from the recording studios – apart from publicity photographs, of course.  Charles would have been only fourteen or fifteen when the first “Beatles” recordings were made: this explains the relatively simple and crude nature of the early songs.

It is less clear who George Martin might have used to make the recordings, but a likely candidate is a “beat group” known as “A Band of Angels” which was formed at the prestigious Harrow School about this time.  Musical instruments were extremely expensive at this time, so it is probable that only the boys of wealthy parents would have been able to raise the money to buy them, and therefore develop any meaningful playing skills.  Or indeed to access the electricity that would have been required.  What Liverpool lad could afford a drum kit in those difficult days?  Certainly not Ringo Starr.  But it would have been no problem for Andrew Charles Malcolm Glywn Petre at Harrow School.

A Band of Angels – did they sing and play the “Beatles” hits?

Intriguingly, almost all evidence of Charles having any musical talent, or indeed any interest in popular music – save a passing reference to a fondness for singing group The Three Degrees – seems to have been carefully expunged from contemporary records.  Such a determined and sophisticated operation to cover his tracks could only have come from the very highest level.

Further evidence is provided by some of the “Beatles” songs.  For example, Back in the USSR displays an advanced knowledge of Soviet geography – the Ukraine, Georgia etc – well beyond the reach of ordinary citizens at the time.  By contrast, it would have been a simple matter for Charles to consult his ambassador for this information.

But what of the frontmen, the actors?  Of course, they had to be kept sweet to protect the royal family’s shameful secret, and this presented difficulties.  John Lennon, notoriously difficult, might have threatened to expose the pretence: in any event, he was assassinated in 1980.  George Harrison died in mysterious (and convenient?) circumstances in 2001.  Paul and Ringo seem to have been more amenable, and were placated with knighthoods.

Charles: unable to face the man killed for his convenience?
In conclusion, while there is still some doubt about who might have performed the “Beatles” songs, there is a compelling case that the compositions traditionally labelled “Lennon/McCartney” or “Harrison” were written by Charles, the young man who would later be King of England and Wales.  And the most persuasive evidence for this, ironically, is the perfect cleansing – and so the complete absence – of any detail in contemporary sources which might confirm this secret.
Charles – forgotten songwriting genius

 

6 thoughts on “The Secret Genius of Charles III

  1. Mr Edwards,

    Persuasive as some elements of your admittedly well-researched thesis may be, I fear that some may find a lengthy case propounded by a de Vere to be no more than a stalking-horse designed to be discredited in short order, the better to leave open the prospect of a general acceptance of the only convincing alternative solution to the authorship conundrum.

    You, Mr Edwards, are in fact the true-born Earl of Oxford, as I am sure your ancestry researches have convinced you, and all this Welsh stuff is simply an attempt to obfuscate matters until such time as you choose to reveal yourself.

    You are Oxford and I claim my £5!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I feel some dodgy fake news in all this – but just what is the hidden agenda?
    Is this a prelude to the mass re-writing of our school history books?
    When began the subtle nudges to change the way we speak into “something new”? (was “lol” but the first step?)
    Are we not even now being micro-mind-managed online by the manipulative munching of our collective big data by the likes of Cambridge Analytica, FaceBook et al. ?

    I fear that on the grand scale of the epoch-spanning cycle of events identifiable by those who study Psychohistory,
    we are only slightly behind schedule in the fulfillment of Mr Orwell’s prophetic doom….

    Like

Leave a Reply to Craig Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s